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I agree that ideas just come. You can think about ideas but it will take a lot of time to figure something. Maybe if you are interested in a certain thing, you can easily think of something.

Peter:

Welcome to the conversation and thank you for taking the time to share your thoughts on observing. In today's post, I used a quote from "The Los Angeles Times" science column writer to illustrate that we experience the world through surfaces -- that's where the action is.

I think ideas come first from observing...and many don't look out "far enough" to observe...that is, they see stuff on the other side of their eyes (the stuff in front of their eyes) but they are too engaged in immediate analysis, judgments, etc., so that what's "out there" does not come to them as when we close our eyes for a time and then open them and allow the objects, shapes, colors, textures to "come to us", to arise in the field in a state of "present moment awareness"; rather manay folks are too quick to try to "make sense" and thus lose the opportunity to really observe...which can lead to really "see", discern...and then, analyze our experience and have faith in the ideas that then arise.

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